Wiki leader Confluence finally gets hosted version

All along I had hoped that Atlassian will one day offer hosted version of Confluence, one of the best and most popular Wiki based collaboration platform. Given the fact that Google has been making aggressive moves in the hosted space with the recent Premier version release and buyout of JotSpot earlier last year, Atlassian has more than 1 reason to go online. Well today Atlassian announced that it has launched hosted version of Confluence. As expected Atlassian has not included a free plan in its offering although you are free to try out with a DEMO account for 30 days. Plans are priced from $49/month or $490/year for 15 users and go upto $449/month or $4,490/year for 500 users. Users get host of features along with the service including ability to create unlimited spaces and pages, upload files, create blogs, content and attachment search, robust ACL, and backups. Some important features that have been missed out in this release include Plugin support and LDAP integration. I am trying to get more details from the Atlassian team about the possibility of future addition of these features.

However the service is in DoA state right now. I think Atlassian didn’t plan for the rush it was going to get hit with. Once the site gets stable, I will try taking a deeper dive. As per Atlassian, only the hosted demo had issues due to application updates. The production paid version hosted on different set of servers is running fine.

Update: I finally got response from Atlassian team informing me that they do have plugin support some of the most request ones including IM Presence Plugin, Blogging RPC Plugin, Vote Macro, Google Calendar, RSVP Plugin, Excel Macro, Word macro, Chart macro, and will be adding the webdav plugin soon. Its just that they won’t allow users to be installing plugins themselves. They are also including SOAP / XML-RPC interfaces, and planning to add API access soon. Sounds great to me.

Links:
Confluence Hosted

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3 Responses to “Wiki leader Confluence finally gets hosted version”

  1. Michael Knighten Says:

    Many thanks for the kind words. We’re very excited about this release, and hope to hear more feedback as you dive in deeper.

    I’m quite concerned, of course, about your DoA experience. I assume you are using the Hosted Evaluation? The Hosted Evaluation has been available for a few months now, on separate systems from the paid Confluence Hosted servers, and we’ve had thousands of users successfully evaluate Confluence using it. Please send me an email with some more details when you can and I will investigate further.

    Thanks again, I look forward to hearing from you.

    Michael Knighten
    Atlassian Software

  2. StartupSquad » Blog Archive » iUpload - more money for wiki solutions Says:

    […] Collaboration is the name of the game thesedays and as a result we have just too many startups doing that. Wetpaint, pbWiki, Confluence, SocialText, Google, Blogtronix, Clearspace, Serebrum, Intel ………And now another well funded startup to compete with for everyone – iUpload. According to PEHub, iUpload has raised $7 million in it’s Series A round of funding from Greylock Partners and North Bridge Venture Partners. iUpload service gets you Wikis, Discussions forums, blogs, forms, ACL,….. iUpload seems to be strong in sales, which can win the game in this scenario. Besides the above, Microsoft bundling Wiki+Forum+Workflows+IM with Sharepoint can make life difficult for everyone. Tags:Share and Enjoy: […]

  3. StartupSquad » Blog Archive » WikiTag - Wikis have a search engine. Says:

    […] While the idea sounds great, there are few challenges to start with. Unlike indexing of websites or indexing of blogs which are either too many in number or are owned by individuals, most of the wiki platforms are controlled by startups like Wetpaint, pbWiki, Atlassian, SocialText, Stikipad, Wikispaces, and more which can out-rightly block the WikiTag bot when it hits their platform. Blog search engine Technorati was able to grow fast ’cause Google was not indexing and enabling search of fresh content 3-4 years back, an area where the search engine giant has now made amends. As compared to that, I don’t see a similar hole in the search space in the case of wikis. Besides that what stops Google from coming up with a similar sub-search engine? […]

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